Mull of Kintyre

Sunday we visited the southwestern most tip of the Kintyre peninsula, the Mull of Kintyre. The public road ends at the top of the descent. I am pretty sure the trek down was more steeper than what we drove. It was a difficult trek down the paved path. It reminded me of the road to the zoo but this one is miles longer and steeper.

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This is the beginning of the path, little steep doesn’t feel so bad on my thighs and calves. I am in shape, I got this…

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Its such a lovely path in the beginning, enticing me forward to the lighthouse in the distance. Beautiful flowers, a friendly buck ram sheep, and an amazing view of the lighthouse.

We thought this Lighthouse was on an island and required the low tide to reach it. As I approached the bottom I learned it was not on its own island.

I really enjoyed the walk. It was picturesque.

Finally I arrived to a beautiful light house.  The lighthouse has been here since 1788, built by Robert Stevenson of the famous lighthouse building family, It is a working lighthouse; however, in 1966 automation began.

 

Awesome visit. Now I must return to the top.

The graceful purple bell wildflowers are originally called Folksglove. The Folksglove gets its common name from the shape of the flower being shaped like a finger of a glove. The glove of the good folk or fairies who frequented the places where this flower grows. It is said that it brings bad luck if the flower is brought into the house. The whole plant is toxic so it has earned nicknames such as ‘dead man’s bells’ and ‘dead men’s fingers’.

There is a tradition in Scotland where the Folksglove leaves are popped into a new born baby’s cradle and this is said to protect the baby from being bewitched.

Since the Romans, Folksglove is used for its medical properties. The Romans used foxglove as both a rat poison and a heart tonic. In the Middle Ages, the plant was used to treat external ulcers and also as a cough medicine or expectorant. Foxglove is the pharmaceutical source of the heart drug digitalis, which is poisonous in an overdose.

There was star shaped pink flowers and moss hugging the rocks. They are Scotland’s version of the stonecrop wildflower succulent. It spreads and creeps to form great carpets, it is truly stunning. The flower has 5 petals and red follicles. Scotland’s green roofing utilizes various sedum species including this one. It gives insulation against the cold and heat and helps absorb rainwater.

Yes I am still heading back up. I am sure you are wondering what my thoughts were walking 2.25 miles up the steep hill. Well, I did have thoughts that my companions were concerned since its been an hour and maybe they would drive the car down to see how I was. I know that was not a reality because there was a padlock on the fence gate. If we were in a fantasy they could have flown the car to me…I continued walking.

BATTLE: Me vs treacherous up hill steep road AND *drum roll please*….Horned Sheep. In my brain: 1:3 odds, not in my favor.

Scared of sheep when I am alone and achy. I am not embarrassed, well maybe a wee bit.

I made it to the top! No picture here! I was sweaty, jacket around the waist, flushed and craving water. It was amazing. I would do it all over.

 

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